why does my back hurt when i do rdls

why does my back hurt when i do rdls

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3 Reasons Your Back Is Hurting During The RDL and How to …

  • From uncommonsensephysique.com
  • Publish date: 22/10/2021
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  • Description: 1. Bending at the waist · 2. Letting the barbell drift away from your thighs/shins · 3. Bleeding away your power with a weak core and lack of …
  • Sumary: 3 Reasons Your Back Is Hurting During The RDL and How to Fix Them The Romanian Deadlift or RDL as it’s more commonly known is a great exercise for adding…

Low Back Pain From RDLs? Try This Alternative.

  • From pippinperformance.com
  • Publish date: 22/10/2021
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  • Description: Typically, the lower back comes into play when you’re unable to properly brace your abs and your pelvis rotates a little too much. Think about having too much …
  • Sumary: Low Back Pain From RDLs? Try This Alternative.Does this sound familiar? You’re doing one of the greatest exercises ever …the Romanian Deadlift…and no matter how hard you try, you can’t…

Why Your Back Hurts After Single Leg Deadlifts

  • From latitude32fitness.com
  • Publish date: 22/10/2021
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  • Description: Your lower back has never isometrically stabilized under load before, and it could go into shock, which will give you the feeling of being super …
  • Sumary: Why Your Back Hurts After Single Leg Deadlifts Fixing the Back with Deadlifts The Single Leg Deadlift (SL DL) is a greatly under utilized exercise to help with lower back…

Deadlift Back Pain Prevention and Treating an Injury

  • From foothillsrehab.com
  • Publish date: 22/10/2021
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  • Description: The majority of lower back injuries caused by the deadlift are the result of improper execution. It stands to reason the best way to avoid a …
  • Sumary: Deadlift Back Pain Prevention and Treating an Injury When properly executed, the deadlift increases our core strength while working more muscles than any other weightlifting exercise. On the other hand,…

FAQs

Why does RDL hurt my back?

It will cement poor movement patterns, which will also carry over into other lifts. It will weaken the posterior chain, leading to increased risk of injury and it will put unwanted strain on the lower back ? and all know what happens next?

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Are RDLS bad for your back?

Where Should I Feel RDLs? You should feel this exercise primarily in the hamstrings and glutes. If you do not feel this exercise in your hamstrings right from the first rep, then you are doing it incorrectly. Focus on pushing your butt way back which will naturally flex the hips and lower the bar down.

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Where should you be feeling RDLs?

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3 Reasons Your Back Is Hurting During The RDL and How to …

3 Reasons Your Back Is Hurting During The RDL and How to Fix Them The Romanian Deadlift or RDL as it’s more commonly known is a great exercise for adding strength and size to the hamstrings and glutes. But it can also be brutal on your back if you’re making one or more of these simple mistakes.  There are lots of ways in which your RDL form could be breaking down, and it’s seldom just one thing that’s going wrong. But from my own experience with this lift, here’s three of the more common mistakes that can quickly get you in trouble and cause you unnecessary pain. 1. Bending at the waist It is entirely possible to achieve 90º or more of flexion at the trunk without any movement of the hips at all. However, bending in this way puts incredible stress on spinae erector muscles of the lower back, as well as compressing the hell out of the vertebrae and discs in the lumbar spine. The RDL is intended to be hip hinge movement, where flexion is achieved through movement of the hips, not the waist. And this means driving your hips backward, essentially lengthening both the glutes and hamstring muscles on the back of the leg.  So if you are coming out of a set of RDLs with your lower back aching, there’s a really good chance you are simply bending at the waist and not leading the movement with an extension of the hips.  One other cue that’s useful here is to keep the hips high. This ensures that you are not also bending at the knee and essentially sitting down into the movement. It can help to imagine that each of your hips is strung to the gym ceiling with a wire that allows the hips to travel backwards and forwards, but not up and down.  2. Letting the barbell drift away from your thighs/shins Next on the list of mistakes is letting the barbell drift away from the body as you lower the weight, and it’s another common reason why lifters feel strain in the lumbar and spinae erector muscles.  As we lower the barbell in the deadlift, we are creating a moment arm with your hips. And the greater the distance the barbell is from your hips (the fulcrum), the longer the moment arm and the greater the moment force – i.e. the effective weight of the barbell.  If you’re struggling with this, think of when you last changed a tire and had to undo those wheel nuts. The shorter the wrench, the harder it is to undo the wheel nuts. That’s because the moment force you can apply to the nut is reduced. When you increase the length of the wrench you can get more leverage, which is the easy way of saying apply greater moment force.  So when you keep the barbell in contact with the thighs, knees and shins, you are minimising the length of the moment arm and getting the best possible leverage on your lift.  3. Bleeding away your power with a weak core and lack of tension If you’ve been around the gym and personal trainers for more than five minutes, you’ll have heard them urging for a or tight core or stay tight.  This is because just about every movement pattern of the human body either originates from or ripples through the trunk, and when our core is not tight, we do not have a stable base to work from.  Combined with proper breathing technique, hard tensing of the core muscles significantly increases the stability and rigidity of the spine, and dramatically increases our lifting performance.  This is true for just about every lift you perform in the gym, and it’s especially true the squat and deadlift where spinal stability is critical to both performance and injury prevention.  At the top of the movement, before you begin the hip hinge, take a deep breath and aggressively flex your core. Lower the bar, pause and about two thirds of the way of the way through your return to the top of the movement, slowly release the breath through pursed lips. This…

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Low Back Pain From RDLs? Try This Alternative.

Low Back Pain From RDLs? Try This Alternative.Does this sound familiar? You’re doing one of the greatest exercises ever …the Romanian Deadlift…and no matter how hard you try, you can’t keep your lower back out of it and it’s causing pain? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. In today’s coaching I’m going to share two alternatives that will give you the same gains as an RDL without the pain.WHY DOES THE LOW BACK PAIN HAPPEN?There are a couple of factors that could play into you always feeling your lower back when doing RDLs. Typically, the lower back comes into play when you’re unable to properly brace your abs and your pelvis rotates a little too much. Think about having too much butt sticking out like you’re trying to get some extra likes on Instagram!The other usual cause is your hips are simply not ready for bilateral hinging (hinging with both hips at the same time). This means you have some funkiness going on in those hips.However, whichever situation you’re in, you can still keep working on your hip hinge with the variations you’ll learn today.TWO ALTERNATIVES TO TRYTry both out and see which one you feel more comfortable with. The first version we’ll have you setup in a slightly staggered stance. This version eliminates the amount of bilateral hip flexion required for the RDL. One leg flexing is way easier than two. The next version will be on one leg only. However, this isn’t a balance exercise, it’s a hip exercise.EQUIPMENT NEEDEDDumbbells or kettlebell you can hold for load Something to balance with like a bench, rig, counter, chair, etc.HOW TO PROGRAM THISStart out with 2-3 sets of 10 and work up to 2-3 sets of 15. Once you’ve mastered that you can start adding load.BUT DON’T FORGET…If you’re always feeling your lower back than you have a hip/spine mobility issue that we can fix real quick. Click the link below to get my Sticky Hips Cheatsheet to pinpoint where your problems are coming from or where weaknesses may be lurking so you can take action. ABOUT COACH MATT PIPPINMatt is a Strength and Mobility Coach with over 15 years experience in his field and has coached over a thousand professional, collegiate and everyday athletes with the goal to help them move, feel and perform at their highest level. He’s incredibly passionate about bringing simple and effective online mobility training programs to everyone who wants to take control of their self care and make lasting change. CLICK HERE to learn more.Certifications: NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist Level 3: Fascial Stretch Specialist Level 1: Institute of Motion Health Coach Certified FRC Mobility Specialist (FRCms) Level 1 Kinstretch Instructor Weck Method Qualified #onlinemobilitytraining #kinstretchonline #mobilitytraining

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>1:00How to Romanian Deadlift (RDL) WITHOUT Back Pain … I can't tell ya how many times I heard, “push your butt back”. Now it's simply “hinge” …YouTube · Squat University · Apr 27, 2022

Why Your Back Hurts After Single Leg Deadlifts

Why Your Back Hurts After Single Leg Deadlifts Fixing the Back with Deadlifts The Single Leg Deadlift (SL DL) is a greatly under utilized exercise to help with lower back (LB) issues. It doesn’t look super glamorous, but it can change your life if done correctly. Just a few benefits include: A stronger core Proper muscle activation Improves cross core motor control Loads posterior chain (hamstrings, glutes and Lats) Improves balance and coordination Increases overall athleticism Transfers well to running So depending on where you are in your training career, will determine why your lower back hurts, after training SL DL’s. If you’re a beginner, I strongly suggest doing the Single Leg Reach before you try to load the SL DL. If it’s your first time and your LB hurts or feels fatigued after the exercise, it could be your body adjusting to training. Your lower back has never isometrically stabilized under load before, and it could go into shock, which will give you the feeling of being super sore or extremely fatigued. This is why it’s important to own the exercise before you decide to increase the load. Or, you could be simply extending through your LB rather than your hips. If you’re familiar with this lift then it could be an activation issue. Maybe you’re not able to “turn on” your core, lats or glutes enough to stabilize the spine. While, in the meantime, your LB is being over used during the movement. You could be shifting the weight forward, which would force the upper back to round and loss tension and stability in the lower back. To fix this, you would lower the load and focus on one muscle group at a time to really dial in the muscular contraction. Here’s what a SL DL should look like. If your back still hurts after a few changes then I suggest strengthening your core, glutes, lats and lower back, or reach out to a medical practitioner.

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Deadlift Back Pain Prevention and Treating an Injury

Deadlift Back Pain Prevention and Treating an Injury When properly executed, the deadlift increases our core strength while working more muscles than any other weightlifting exercise. On the other hand, improper execution could stress your lower back, leading to a painful sprain or strain. Knowing what back pain preventative measures to take, the correct lifting technique, and what to do if your lower back is sore after deadlift exercises are important. Sprain or Strain Is it a sprain? Or is it a strain? A strain results from the lower back’s muscle fibers being overly stretched or torn. A sprain occurs when ligaments are torn. Both injuries can result in intense lower back pain, stiffness, muscle spasms, and decreased mobility. The Healing Process Whether your lower back pain results from a strain or a sprain, the only true cure is time. An initial 48- to 72-hour intense pain will usually give way to the discomfort that gradually diminishes over the following week or two; I know this first hand. While there are measures we can take to relieve pain associated with the deadlift, such as applying ice for 15–20 minutes every couple hours for the first three days, followed by 15–20 minutes of a moist hot pack beginning on the fourth day, this will do nothing if you do not take time off from physical activity. You should also avoid any heavy lifting or excessive flexing of the spine. If you return to pumping iron too soon, you will likely find yourself sidelined for another couple of weeks, which can be difficult if you’re used to being active. Exercises After Injury It’s best to stick with the basics following lumbar strains and sprains. Core stability exercises such as glute squeezes, pelvic tilts, abdominal draw-in maneuvers, bridge exercises, and dead bugs are a good start. When You’re Ready to Deadlift Again   The majority of lower back injuries caused by the deadlift are the result of improper execution. It stands to reason the best way to avoid a sprain or a strain is by performing the lift properly. To achieve a proper deadlift stance, your feet should be positioned so the bar is directly over the center of your feet. With an overhand hold on the bar, your arms should be vertical — perpendicular in relation to the floor — and your shoulder blades should be directly over the bar. With your back straight, begin the lift by extending your legs as you push down on your heels. When the bar reaches your shins — just below the knees — continue the lift by thrusting the hips forward to bring the body to an upright position. This is important because pulling back on the bar creates stress on our lower back, which may result in a strain or sprain of the lumbar region. Finally, complete the lift by squeezing the gluteal muscles. To lower the weight, all you need to do is follow the abovementioned steps in reverse order. Deadlift Tips While such tips as keeping our back straight might seem easy enough to remember now, the truth is, attempting to lift several hundred pounds of dead weight can be very intimidating — thus causing one’s attention to become focused elsewhere. One way to ensure you do not inadvertently round the back while executing a deadlift is by thrusting the chest forward and maintaining it throughout the exercise; remember, the chest always wins! Also, because the bar often scrapes against the shins and kneecaps as it’s being raised, many weightlifters risk injuring their lower backs by holding it too far away from their bodies. Wearing long pants or shin guards to…

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Videos

>1:00How to Romanian Deadlift (RDL) WITHOUT Back Pain … I can't tell ya how many times I heard, “push your butt back”. Now it's simply “hinge” …YouTube · Squat University · Apr 27, 2022